Healthy Eating

Age-appropriate nutrition

Kids have changing nutritional needs as they grow.
We customise snack boxes based on your child's age, activity level and body type.

PRE-SCHOOLERS
(3-5 YRS)

child1
  • Approaching school age
  • Eating habits formed
  • Brain is developing fast
  • Needs strong immune system

WHAT TO EAT

Fruits and veggies,
wholegrains and healthy fats

SUITABLE SNACKS

Fruit rolls, bars, nuts and
wholegrain cakes - packed with
vitamins, minerals and fibre

MIDDLE-CHILDHOOD
(6-9 YRS)

child2
  • Establishing peer groups
  • Growing quickly, more active
  • Bones develop in size and strength
  • Higher nutrient needs

WHAT TO EAT

Starchy carbohydrates, proteins,
dairy and five portions of fruit and veg

SUITABLE SNACKS

Yoghurt bites, fruit bars, nut mixes,
wholegrain crackers, apple rings
and blueberries

PRE-TEENS
(10-12 YRS)

child3
  • Physical changes accelerate
  • Susceptible to iron deficiency
  • Intensive bone growth
  • More independent food choices

WHAT TO EAT

Iron rich foods, dairy products
rich in calcium for good bone growth

SUITABLE SNACKS

Yoghurt snacks, snacks with
raisins and apricots

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How do we compare?

Sugar Content

Apple

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    15g
  • N
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Granola Bar

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    19g
  • R
  • E
  • F
  • I
  • N
  • E
  • D
  • S
  • U
  • G
  • A
  • R

Average
CM Snack

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    10g
  • N
  • A
  • T
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The role of snacks in a child’s life

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Young children have small stomachs so snacks are a necessity, especially when they’re growing quickly and burning energy.

For picky eaters snacks can help top up meals, as well as fit in extra nutrients for physical and mental development.

Healthy family meals are great, but it’s important to make sure your child is practicing good snacking habits too.

The right amount of snacks - is there
such a thing?

Kids usually have a good idea of their energy levels – often better than adults. They’ll generally ask for snacks or make a fuss when hungry or tired.

Sticking to small, regular snacks will fill your children up, while maintaining their appetite for mealtime. Our ChewyMoon snacks are perfectly portioned for kids.

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What exactly is sugar?

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There are different types of sugar - naturally occurring sugars in fruit, vegetables milk and grains, and refined sugar derived from sugar beet, sugar cane etc.

Refined sugar consumption has increased dramatically over the past four decades and has been linked to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other health conditions.

Comparing refined sugar and natural sugar

The chemical structure of table sugar is very similar to the chemical structure of natural sugar. However, that doesn’t mean that cakes and pastries are interchangeable with apples and bananas.

Fruit contains a lot of useful nutrients like vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, while the nutritional value of cakes and pastries is very low. Furthermore, fruit contains fibre, slowing down the absorption of sugar into the blood stream. This then helps prevent sugar spikes and concentration lapses.

Products with refined sugar should not be given to children, which is why at ChewyMoon we refrain from using refined sugars in any of our snacks.

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Fiber

Fibre is an important part of a healthy balanced diet and (luckily) almost all ChewyMoon snacks are packed with fibre.

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Fruit and vegetables

Children in the UK only consume two out of the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables per day. Many of our snacks count as one of your five a day. Check out our snacks page for more information.

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Fat

Though too much fat can be unhealthy, certain kinds of fat are good for us and are an important part of a healthy diet.

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Salt

Average salt intake in children and teenagers aged 4 to 18 years (but excluding children aged 7 to 10 years) continues to exceed the SACN recommendations.

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Eating fruit and veg can be fun:

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• Too much space above/below lines in the same sentence - they shoud be tighter together.
• Text on the right side is not aligned wit text on the left.
• Keep fruit washed, cut up and in plain sight in the refrigerator.
• Serve salads more often.
• Try out vegetarian recipes for spaghetti, lasagne, chili, or other foods.
• Include at least one leafy green or yellow vegetable for vitamin A such as spinach, broccoli, winter squash, greens, or carrots each day.

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headveggies

• Include at least one vitamin C–rich fruit or vegetable, such as oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, melon, tomato, and broccoli each day.
• Add a fruit or vegetable as part of every meal or snack.
• Put fruit on cereal.
• Add a piece of fruit or small salad to your child’s lunch.
• Use vegetables and dip for an after-school snack.
• Parents are great role models - eat more fruits and vegetables yourself.

In summary:

Variety is key! Offer a wide range of fruit and vegetables.

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Kids eventually cease to be fussy eaters if you keep offering healthy foods.

Eat lots of healthy food yourself. Kids copy their parents.

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The main source of hydration should always be water.

Reward with attention not sweets.

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Get creative in the kitchen.

A healthy lifestyle = balanced diet + lots of physical activity.

Stamina
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Have fun! A healthy lifestyle is easier to maintain if you enjoy every aspect of it!